Free Download Java Cookbook (3rd Edition)

Java CookbookFree download Java Cookbook Third Edition in PDF written by Ian F. Darwin and published by O’Reilly Media, Inc. 

According to the Author, “Java 8 is the new kid on the block. Java 7 was a significant but incremental improvement over its predecessors. So much has changed since the previous edition of this book! What was “new in Java 5” has become ubiquitous in Java: annotations, generic types, concurrency utilities, and more. APIs have come and gone across the entire tableau of Java: JavaME is pretty much dead now that BlackBerry has abandoned it; JSF is (slowly) replacing JSP in parts of Enterprise Java; and Spring continues to expand its reach. Many people seem to think that “desktop Java” is dead or even that “Java is dying,” but it is definitely not rolling over yet; Swing, JavaFX, Java Enterprise, and (despite a major lawsuit by Oracle) Android are keeping the Java language very much alive. Additionally, a renewed interest in other “JVM languages” such as Groovy, JRuby, Jython, Scala, and Clojure is keeping the platform in the forefront of the development world.  

Java 8 is the new kid on the block. Java 7 was a significant but incremental improvement over its predecessors. So much has changed since the previous edition of this book! What was “new in Java 5” has become ubiquitous in Java: annotations, generic types, concurrency utilities, and more. APIs have come and gone across the entire tableau of Java: JavaME is pretty much dead now that BlackBerry has abandoned it; JSF is (slowly) replacing JSP in parts of Enterprise Java; and Spring continues to expand its reach. Many people seem to think that “desktop Java” is dead or even that “Java is dying,” but it is definitely not rolling over yet; Swing, JavaFX, Java Enterprise, and (despite a major lawsuit by Oracle) Android are keeping the Java language very much alive. Additionally, a renewed interest in other “JVM languages” such as Groovy, JRuby, Jython, Scala, and Clojure is keeping the platform in the forefront of the development world.

I’ve also removed certain APIs that were in the previous editions. Most notable is the chapter on serial and parallel ports (pared down to one recipe in Chapter 10); computers generally don’t ship with these anymore, and hardly anybody is using them: the main attention has moved to USB, and there doesn’t seem to be a standard API for Java yet (nor, frankly, much real interest among developers).

Table of Contents

  1. Getting Started: Compiling, Running and Debugging
  2. Interacting with the Environment
  3. Strings and Things
  4. Pattern Matching with Regular Expressions
  5. Numbers
  6. Dates and Times – New API
  7. Structuring Data with Java
  8. Object-Oriented Techniques
  9. Functional Programming Techniques: Functional Interfaces, Streams, Parallel Collections
  10. Input and Output
  11. Directory and File System Operations
  12. Media: Graphics, Audio, Video
  13. Network Clients
  14. Graphical User Interfaces
  15. Internationalization and Localization
  16. Server-Side Java
  17. Java and Electronic Mail
  18. Database Access
  19. Processing JSON Data
  20. Processing XML
  21. Packages and Packaging
  22. Threaded Java
  23. Reflection
  24. Appendixes

Free download Java Cookbook Third Edition in PDF written by Ian F. Darwin from following download links.

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File Size: 14 MB                    Pages: 896            Please Read Disclaimer

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Also Available: An Introduction to Object Oriented Programming with Java (5th Edition)

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